Designing a Culture of Critique

Cover_image_critique.jpg

Critique  is  one  of  the  most  crucial  conversations  there  is.  How  to  ask  for  and  get  feedback  when  you  need  it  is  a  core  life  skill.  Without  it,  we’re  in  the  dark.  Setting  up  a  special  time  and  place  with  clear  rules  and  goals  to  get  the  crucial  feedback  you  need  to  move  forward...that’s  designing  the  conversation,  and  I  can’t  think  of  a  conversation  that’s  more  critical.  Pun  Intended!  

My  guests  today  are  the  authors  of  the  wonderful  (and  quick  reading!)  book  Discussing  Design:  Improving  Communication  and  Collaboration  through  Critique Adam  Connor,  VP  Organizational  Design  &  Training  at  the  strategic  design  consultancy  Mad  Pow  and  Aaron  Irizarry,  Head  of  Experience  Infrastructure  at  Capital  One.  

Critique  isn’t  just  fancy  feedback...Critique  is  about  asking  for  and  the  designing  the  conversation  you  need  to  have,  with  the  people  you  need  to  engage.  Do  you  want:  a  Reaction,  a  clear  Direction  or  deep  analysis?  That’s  Critique:  it  has  rules  and  boundaries,  and  if  you  don’t  ask  for  critique,  you  can’t  get  it.  

We  dig  into  the  3  myths  of  Critique,  how  critique  isn’t  really  a  designers  skill,  it’s  a  life  skill  for  anyone  trying  to  bust  out  of  the  status  quo.  

I  want  to  highlight  a  few  things  you’ll  hear  towards  the  end.  I  asked  Adam  and  Aaron  to  discuss  how  they  handle  a  few  key  aspects  of  the  Conversation  OS  Canvas  in  their  critiques,  like  power  dynamics,  turn-taking,  and  interfaces  and  spaces  for  the  conversation.  

Invitation:  The  core  point  (and  what  the  opening  quote  is  all  about)  is  that  you  get  the  critique  you  ask  for.  And  that  if  someone  *isn’t*  asking  for  critique  it’s  pretty  tricky  to  offer  it  to  them  successfully.  In  those  cases,  getting  permission  to  give  feedback  is  essential.  

Embed Block
Add an embed URL or code. Learn more

Power:    Adam  sets  the  ground  rules  that  if  you’re  invited  to  the  critique  session,  your  voice  should  be  heard,  and  that  in  this  session  we’re  all  equal.  The  facilitator  is  there  to  balance  voices,  to  call  out  people  who  are  to  dominating  or  hiding  in  the  conversation.  

Interface:  I  always  say  that  when  you  change  the  interface  you  change  the  conversation.  Adam  and  Aaron  both  prefer  in-person  critique  conversations  –  email  isn’t  designed  to  support  the  depth  of  communication  real  critique  requires  and  as  they  say  Asynchronous  feedback  will  never  be  the  same  as  a  live  conversation. But  as  teams  become  more  distributed  and  digital,  they’ve  found  some  benefit  in  doing  a  pre-read and  a  notation  round in  a  tool  like  InVision  or  Mural,  and  then  moving  to  a  video  call.    

Turn-Taking:  While  I  am  pretty  obsessive  about  turn-taking,  Adam  says  that  he’s  sensitive  to  it,  but  doesn’t  want  to  over-control  it,  preferring  an  organic  flow.  He’ll  sometimes  use  a  round-robin to  make  sure  everyone  speaks  in  turn  and  at  least  once.  Finding  a  way  to  balance  voices  within  an  organic  structure  requires  a  skillful  facilitator.

 

Also: There's a video, if you prefer watching over listening!